Easy Classic Peach Bellini Recipe & 5 Fun Alternatives

peach bellini glass surrounded by peaches

From fun boozy brunches to glitzy evening drinks, the classic bellini is a versatile and low-alcohol cocktail that can be enjoyed at any time of day. It’s light, fruity, and elegantly refreshing, without being too sweet or overbearing. And the best part? The classic peach bellini recipe is super simple to make at home to enjoy by yourself or impress your guests with. Below is how to make a peach bellini, plus some fun variations if you want to try something a little different.

What is a Bellini?

A bellini is a sparkling white peach cocktail originating from Italy but now popular all across the world. The drink was invented in 1948 byGiuseppe Cipriani, founder of the legendary Harry’s Bar in Venice.Cipriani named the cocktail after fifteenth-century Venetian painter Giovanni Bellini. But some cocktail connoisseurs refer to the classic drink as the ‘BelliniCipriani’ after its founder.

Bellini vs Mimosa

Although many people still confuse these two cocktails, they’re actually two very different drinks. Both do consist of sparkling wine and a fruity mixer. But while a bellini is made with Italian Prosecco and peach puree, a mimosa contains Fresh Champagne and fresh orange juice. Learn more: Prosecco vs Champagne: What’s The Difference?

Peach Bellini Ingredients

So, what’s in a bellini?

A classic peach bellini is made with just two ingredients:

  • Prosecco
  • Peach purée

Being such a simple cocktail, you’ll want to choose high-quality ingredients to get the best flavour.

How many peaches do you need: For each bottle of Prosecco, you’ll want approximately 3 large ripe peaches or 1 pound of frozen peaches.

Peach Bellini Recipe

There are two main steps to making a peach bellini; making the peach puree and making the bellini cocktail.

How to make peach puree:

  • Peel the peaches (boil in hot water then transfer to an ice bath to loosen skins)
  • Cut peaches in half and remove the pits
  • Blend in a food processor or blender until smooth

Make in advance: Make the peach puree for bellinis in advance and chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes before making the cocktail. Peach puree can be kept in the fridge for several days after its made. Add a splash of lemon juice to help preserve the puree for longer.

Freezing left over peach puree: you can also freeze any left over peach puree, great for next time. You can typically freeze it for up to 3 month. Defrost in the fridge for a few hours or overnight depending how much you froze.

If using frozen peaches, make sure to thaw them (try running them under warm water) to room temperature before putting them in the blender.

How to make a peach bellini:

  • Add 1/4 cup (around 30g) of chilled peach puree to a glass
  • Pour in a small amount of Prosecco and mix with the puree
  • Top off glass with Prosecco
  • Stir gently and try not to mix out the bubbles
  • Garnish with a peach slice (optional)

Even if you’re making the peach puree in advance, don’t pour the Prosecco until just before you serve in order to preserve the bubbles.

Which peaches should you use in a bellini?

The original bellini is made with fresh white peaches. If you can get your hands on these, this is what you want to use. However, they are only in season for a very short period in June to early July. Many bartenders also now use yellow peaches as they are much more widely available. Yellow peaches make for a great bellini cocktail, so using these isn’t a problem. And, to be honest, it’s going to be the easier option for most of us choosing to make a bellini at home.

If peaches are out of season or you can’t find any, canned or frozen peaches work too. However, processed peaches do tend to have a higher sugar content than fresh peaches, so you will end up with a slightly sweeter cocktail. Choose unsweetened canned peaches if you can find them.

Peach juice and purees from supermarkets: It’s now possible to buy peach puree already made. It’s not a bad solution if you’re short on time but do check the ingredient list. Artificial flavours don’t taste so good and watch out for any extra added sugar. Try to avoid peach nectar or peach liqueur as these will also make the cocktail overly sweet; while peach juice is one to avoid as it’s too thin without the peach pulp.

Which Prosecco should you use in a bellini?

While you’ll often find bartenders making bellinis with Champagne or other sparkling wines, a traditional bellini should be made with a proper Italian Prosecco.

There’s a lot to know about choosing a good Italian Prosecco (this site is packed with info about Prosecco if you want to learn more), but here’s a very quick summary of what to look for:

  • Check if it’s actually Italian
  • Look for DOC or DOCG on the label
  • Make sure it’s at least 85% Glera grape

For a bellini, opt for a low-sugar brut (dry) Prosecco rather than a sweeter Prosecco. We’ll say it again: a bellini shouldn’t be too sweet.

Which Glass to use for a Bellini?

A traditional bellini glass is similar to a stemless champagne flute or small highball glass. But if you don’t have any of these lying around, a regular Champagne flute works just as well. And we feel more elegant using these anyway.


Alternative Bellini Recipes

strawberry bellinis on a board with red straws

The recipe for a peach bellini is one that is often altered and played around with by bartenders and amateur cocktail makers alike. Below are some of our favourite alternative bellini recipes to give you a twist on the classic.

Frozen Peach Bellini

The frozen bellini is one of the simplest variations of the classicbellini cocktail recipe. To make a frozen peach bellini, just blend frozen peaches with Prosecco, pour into your glass, then top with a little more Prosecco and mix gently. Some people like to add a liqueur (such as peach schnapps) to a frozen bellini too for a higher-alcohol and sweeter summer cocktail.

Strawberry Bellini

To make a strawberry bellini, use the same method to make a peach bellini but swap the fresh peaches for fresh strawberries. Don’t forget to strain the strawberries after pureeing them to remove any seeds. Any sparkling wine works well here, but many choose to add Champagne to this cocktail for the classic strawberries and Champagne pairing.

Bitter Bellini

The bitter bellini is the lovechild of two of our favourite Prosecco cocktails – the bellini and the Aperol Spritz. So if you’re a fan of both of these, give this variation a go. Simply mix together peach liqueur, Aperol, and Prosecco. A beautiful bittersweet creation you can enjoy at brunch or as a pre-dinner aperitif.

Bellini Royale

Truly the king of the bellini variations, the Bellini Royale is made with only the most luxurious ingredients. Mix equal parts Cognac and Peach Brandy, then top with Prosecco or Champagne. This one is guaranteed to impress your guests.

Dark Summer Fruits Bellini

Inspired by the Bellini Royale, this is our own inspiration – pairing Prosecco with a blend of dark summer fruits. Whether you blend up the fruits that are going squidgy in your fridge or turn to one of the supermarket frozen dark fruit blends, this lower-sugar bellini will refresh you on a hot summer’s day. Just follow the recipe for the strawberry bellini, sieving the blended fruits. What dark fruits to use? Try blackberries, blackcurrants and dark cherries. If it’s too tart, consider using a sweeter Prosecco like Prosecco Extra Dry or Dry (remembering that Dry is actually sweeter than brut with Italian wines).

That’s our classic bellini recipe with 5 twists on the original. Let us know if you try it.

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